accessibility links: Pupil Premium

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Pupil Premium

Background

The Government believes that the Pupil Premium, which is additional to main school funding, is the best way to address the current underlying inequalities between children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and their peers by ensuring that funding to tackle disadvantage reaches the pupils who need it most.

The Pupil Premium was introduced in April 2011 and is allocated to schools to work with pupils who have been registered for free school meals at any point in the last six years (known as ‘Ever 6 FSM’).

Schools also receive funding for children who have been looked after continuously for more than six months, and children of service personnel.

In most cases the Pupil Premium is paid direct to schools, allocated to them for every pupil who receives free school meals. Schools decide how to use the funding, as they are best placed to assess what additional provision their pupils need.

Chestnut Lane School

2015 / 2016

We received £3,960 for Pupil Premium, presenting 1.5% of the school population.

We will continue to use this money to provide personalised learning sessions for Pupil Premium pupils, as the interventions planned by a senior teacher and delivered by an experienced learning support assistant are proving to be very successful as demonstrated by the progress results reported for 2014/15.

Impact
We will monitor this over the year and will amend the interventions provided according to the individual needs of this group of pupils. The details of impact will be reported at the end of the academic year.

2014 / 2015

We received £6,500 for Pupil Premium, representing 3% of the school population.

The money was used to…

  • Provide personalised learning sessions for Pupil Premium pupils.
  • Identify interventions via teacher assessments which were delivered by learning support assistants and monitored by senior leaders.

Impact

  • 100% of pupils made more than expected progress in reading, writing and maths in key stage 1.

2013 / 2014

We received £2,700 for Pupil Premium which represented 2% of the school population.

This money was used to…

  • Fund specific interventions tailored to the needs of individual children, delivered through additional learning support assistant hours.

Impact

  • 100% of pupils made at least expected progress at key stage 1.
  • 100% of pupils in year 1 made more than expected progress in reading and writing.
  • 50% of early years pupils made expected progress in reading and writing but 100% achieved expected progress in all other areas.

2012 / 2013

Chestnut Lane School received £1,200 for Pupil Premium which represents 1% of the school population.

This money was used to...

  • Purchase E books which all children can access but which will be used to motivate pupils who are reluctant readers working below national average, as well as challenge pupils who are confident readers and who are working above the national average.
  • It was also used to cover Lunchtime club fees for children in receipt of Pupil Premium.
  • Provide additional learning support assistant hours dedicated to providing ‘targeted interventions’ such as Rainbow Road, social skills development and additional support for the basic skills.

Impact

  • 100% of the pupils made at least expected progress in all areas.
  • 50% of the pupils made more than expected progress in reading and writing.

2011 / 2012

Chestnut Lane School received £200 for Pupil Premium which represented 0.5% of the school population.

This money contributed to...

  • Purchasing additional phonics resources for use by all children.

Impact

  • 62% of year 1 pupils achieved the expected standard in the Year 1 phonics Screening Check.

awards:
UNICEF Rights Respecting School - Level 2 Healthy Schools